• Standards Based Grading

    A Standards-Based grade reporting system is designed to inform parents about their child’s progress towards achieving specific learning standards. The New Jersey Student Learning Standards establish high and challenging performance expectations for all students. They describe what students should know and be able to do, and serve as the basis for the Stanhope School District’s curriculum, instruction and assessment model. The Standards-Based Report Card highlights most important student skills in each subject area and grade level, assesses “how well a child mastered each skill” within a subject area and identifies areas of student strength and weakness to better inform instruction.

Report Card Templates

Benchmarks

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q. What is Standards-Based grade reporting?

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    A Standards-Based grade reporting system is designed to inform parents about their child’s progress towards achieving specific learning standards. The New Jersey Student Learning Standards establish high and challenging performance expectations for all students. They describe what students should know and be able to do, and serve as the basis for the Stanhope School District’s curriculum, instruction and assessment model.

    The Standards-Based Report Card:

    • Highlights most important student skills in each subject area and grade level
    • Assesses “how well a child mastered each skill” within a subject area
    • Identifies areas of student strength and weakness to better inform instruction
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  • Q. What is the purpose of the Standards-Based report card?

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    This report card allows parents and students to understand more clearly what is expected at each grade level. With this understanding, parents will be better able to guide and support their child helping him/her to be successful in a rigorous academic program.

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  • Q. How is this report card different?

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    • Indicators for content areas are specified each marking period
    • A benchmark-based assessment scale
    • Students are assessed based on grade level standards
    • Each grade level has its own unique report card
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  • Q. How does the Standards-Based Report Card compare to the letter grade system?

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    • Letter grades do not tell parents which skills their children have mastered or whether they are working at grade level.
    • A Standards-Based Report Card gives parents a better understanding of their child’s strengths and weaknesses and encourages all students to do their best.
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  • Q. What Research was used in the development of the new report card?

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    Research included

      • Developing Standards Based Report Cards, Guskey, 2006
      • Classroom Assessment and Grading that Work, Marzano, 2006
      • Assessment and Student Success in a Differentiated Classroom, Tomlinson and Moon, 2013
      • Habits of Mind, Costa and Kallick, 2009
      • Review of dozens of sample Standards-Based Report Cards
      • Ongoing consultation with our Professional Staff, administration, regional colleagues, Literacy and Math Specialists, and an external consultant
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  • Q. What is the role of the marking period benchmarks?

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    • A benchmark is an explicit set of criteria used for assessing student performance of a specific skill.
    • The benchmarks in each subject area will change in each grade level across marking periods
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  • Q. What is the Assessment Scale?

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    Our Standards-Based benchmarks are designed on a scale of 1-4.

     

    4: The Student independently and consistently exceeds marking period benchmark standards and shows evidence of higher-level thinking.  Earning a “4” means the student has advanced understanding and exceeds grade-level expectations.  A student receiving a “4” demonstrates academically superior skills in that specific area. This student shows initiative, challenges himself or herself, and demonstrates this advanced knowledge at school.  A “4” indicates unusually high achievement.

     

    3: GRADE LEVEL EXPECTATION – The student consistently meets marking period benchmark standards.  Earning a “3” means the student has proficient understanding and meets grade-level expectations.  We want all of our students to reach a level “3.” A student receiving a “3” is right on track with our high academic expectations.  A “3” is something to be celebrated.!

     

    2: The student demonstrates progress toward meeting marking period benchmark standards.  Earning a “2” means the student has basic understanding and partially meets grade-level expectations.  A student receiving a “2” understands the basic concepts or skill, but has not yet reached the proficient level.  A “2” should indicate to parents that their child may need some extra help or extra time to practice/understand that concept or skill.  


    1: The student demonstrates limited progress toward meeting marking period benchmark standards.  A student receiving a “1” has academic delays according to our district standards, and interventions may be needed to learn and stay on track with district expectations.

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  • Q. How can parents explain to their children why they did not get a 4?

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    It is important that parents and teachers have honest conversations with students. Some concepts and skills are more difficult to grasp than others, but given time and motivation, students can continually challenge themselves. Attitudes are contagious and it is important that adults involved convey to the child that learning is a process that needs to be respected.   A score of 2 while learning a new skill or concept is appropriate. A score of 3 demonstrating mastery is to be celebrated. A score of 4 indicates a strength being recognized that is above and beyond the grade level expectations.

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  • Q. How do teachers determine proficiency levels in standards based grading?

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    Teachers use a variety of methods and tools to assess students' proficiency levels based on the standards for that grade level. They look at evidence of student proficiency by analyzing work samples and reviewing student performance on activities, projects and assessments such as quizzes and tests, as well as collecting classroom participation and anecdotal notes. This collected evidence of a student's learning is compared to what a student is expected to know or do according to the district grade level standards.

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  • Q. My child has special needs and has an Individual Education Plan. How will he or she be assessed?

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    Modifications and accommodations in your child’s IEP are written to support his or her progress on grade level standards. Your child's progress will be assessed and reported using grade level standards, with the appropriate accommodations or modifications as outlined in the IEP. We strive through our district teaching and assessments to help all students master grade level curriculum standards. Different students make progress at different rates, so standards may be met in varying lengths of time, with varying levels of teacher support. Students with IEPs will also receive progress reports from the Child Study Team as they have in the past.

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  • Q. Why are some areas marked with an “X” on the accompanying benchmark documents?

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    Not all standards are taught during every trimester. Standards that have not yet been taught are indicated with an “X” on the report card and are “greyed out” on the accompanying benchmark document.

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Last Modified Yesterday at 9:25 AM